Ted Hughes

Ted Hughes: 12 Essential Poems Human Voices Wake Us

Tonight I read twelve essential poems from the British poet Ted Hughes (1930-1998). They can all be found in his Collected Poems (smaller selections of his poetry include Selected Poems 1957-1994 and A Ted Hughes Bestiary). In this episode I also read from The Letters of Ted Hughes. The poems are: Wind (from the Hawk in the Rain, 1957) Six Young Men (from the Hawk in the Rain, 1957) Crow's Song About God (from Crow, 1970-71) “I skin the skin” (from Gaudete, 1977) A Green Mother (from Cave Birds, 1978) Bride and Groom Lie Hidden for Three Days (from Cave Birds, 1978) Cock-Crows (from Remains of Elmet, 1979) Rain (from Moortown Diary, 1979) February 17th (from Moortown Diary, 1979) Four March Watercolours (from River, 1983) October Salmon (from River, 1983) Life After Death (from Birthday Letters, 1998) This is followed by a reading Hughes gave of his poem, “October Salmon.” Other episodes on Hughes include one where he discusses privacy for his family in the wake of Sylvia Plath’s posthumous fame; another where he discusses how he discovered poetry; and another, much longer episode of readings (4.5 hours) from Hughes’s poetry. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Ted Hughes Responds to Fame Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of a letter written by the poet Ted Hughes, to friend and critic Al Alvarez, in November of 1971. At this time, Alvarez was publishing an intimate (and to Hughes's mind, exploitative) account of the 1963 suicide of the poet Sylvia Plath. The letter can be found in The Letters of Ted Hughes, pages 321-326.  I use this letter as a starting point to wonder why we treat the famous, or just the infamous, the way we do. The anecdotal knowledge of Ted Hughes's and Sylvia Plath's marriage and private life either turns the two of them into entertainment and anecdote, or it places the two of them onto the exaggerated plinths of Monster and Victim. This intrusion into private lives and private griefs, and the ease with which we, fifty years later, continue to lap up the gossip surrounding well-known people, and our own desire to turn people into symbols, should be an obvious parallel to Twitter and cable news. What if all of it just isn't any of our business? Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Ted Hughes's Origin Story Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from the letters of Ted Hughes, on how he came to discover a love for poetry, the natural world, as well as folklore and mythology, and how all three became intertwined and essential to his life. The poet in question, whose name I don't reveal until the end, is Ted Hughes. The letters I read from here can be found in Letters of Ted Hughes. If you can recommend a similar story about how anyone discovered their passion, and would like me to read from, email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Ted Hughes: A Handful of Short Poems from the 1970s Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of eleven short poems from a handful of books that Ted Hughes published during the 1970s. As I explain in the introduction, the period was one of creative flux for Hughes, and the collections that these poems come from are not always successful as books; however, there are magnificent poems to be found within them, and they are easily read outside the context of the books they were first embedded in. They can all be found in his Collected Poems. The poems are: Prometheus on His Crag (1973) #7 Gaudette (1977) I skin the skin Uncollected (1977-1978) New Foal Orts (1978) #1 #44 Cave Birds (1978) The Executioner A Green Mother Bride and Groom Lie Hidden for Three Days Adam & the Sacred Nine And the Phoenix has come Earthnumb (1979) Life is Trying to Be Life A God Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Ted Hughes: 3 Poems from "River" Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of three poems from Ted Hughes's 1983 book, River. It can be found in his Collected Poems. The poems read here are: Four March Watercolours After Moonless Midnight October Salmon Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Ted Hughes: 7 Poems from "Remains of Elmet" Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of seven poems from Ted Hughes's 1979 collection, Remains of Elmet, which can be found in his Collected Poems. The seven poems are:  The Trance of Light Hill-Stone was Content Remains of Elmet The Ancient Briton Lay under His Rock Heptonstall Widdop Cock-Crows Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Ted Hughes: Five Poems from "Moortown Diary" Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of five poems from Ted Hughes’s 1979 collection, “Moortown Diary.” The poems are:  "Rain"  "Struggle"  "February 17th"  "Birth of Rainbow" "A Monument"  Buy Hughes’s Collected Poems.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.   I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Ted Hughes: A Bunch of Crow Poems Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of nine Crow poems by Ted Hughes. The contents of Hughes's Crow collections, first published in 1970, vary widely; these poems are taken from his Collected Poems: King of Carrion Crow and the Birds Crow's First Lesson Crow Tyrannosaurus A Childish Prank Crowego Song Against the White Owl Crow's Courtship Crow's Song About God  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Ted Hughes: Selected Poems Human Voices Wake Us

A collection of all of Ted Hughes’s poetry that I have recorded and posted here over the past year. They can all be found in his Collected Poems (smaller selections of his poetry include Selected Poems 1957-1994 and A Ted Hughes Bestiary). Rather than organizing my readings of Hughes’s poetry chronologically, I start with what seems to me his best poetry (and some of the best poetry in English, period)—that is, the poetry he published between 1970 and 1983. Only after these are his first three collections read from; the readings after that pick up his later career. A full table of contents can be downloaded here (it is too large to paste into the episode description). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support