History

Tonight I talk about the nature of horror/true crime books and movies to ask: what makes a story truly frightening, instead of just entertaining? What kinds of movies or books, or ways of storytelling, take us beyond entertainment to true horror, to actual fear? How does the disturbing story of Ed Gein end up, filtered through convention and expectation, as “standard” (even if classic) movies like Psycho, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and The Silence of the Lambs? Discussed along the way: Marlon Brando in Apocalypse Now, the new Netflix series on Jeffrey Dahmer, the movie The Exorcist, Stephen King’s Pet Sematary, the use of crime scene photos for advertising TV shows, and the unavoidable re-traumatization of victims and their families with each new show, book, movie (or, indeed, podcast). Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Witches in America, Napoleon in Egypt, & the Invention of the Printed Book Human Voices Wake Us

Tonight I read three sections from Jacques Barzun’s book From Dawn to Decadence: 1500 to the Present: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life: The expedition of French scholars that followed Napoleon into Egypt (24: 18) The invention of the printed book, and what it meant to education and literacy (44:00) On the Salem Witch trials of 1692, and how closely science at the time was allied with superstition You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter, by clicking here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Standing on Two Feet & the Evolution of Language Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from a handful of sections from Steven Mithen’s book The Prehistory of the Mind: A Search for the Origins of Art, Religion and Science. (That book is an identical reissue to the one first published that I read, with a slightly different title, as The Prehistory of the Mind: The Cognitive Origins of Art and Science). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Anthology: Poems by Lowell, Clare, Barbauld, Finch, Spenser // First Person: Eudora Welty & Helen Keller Human Voices Wake Us

Another two part episode: in the first, I read five poems: Robert Lowell (1917-1977), “Bobby Delano” John Clare (1793-1864), “An Invite to Eternity” Anna Laetitia Barbauld (1743-1825), “A Summer Evening’s Meditation” Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea (1661-1720), “A Nocturnal Reverie” Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), from The Faerie Queen, Book 3, Canto 6 In the second (starting at 42:00), I read from Eudora Welty’s One Writer’s Beginnings, and Helen Keller’s The Story of My Life. Both, in their own way, are about each writer’s earliest discovery of words. As with many First Person segments, come from the pages of Lapham’s Quarterly, one of the best collections of voices from history that I know. Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

First Person: Funeral Home Director // Telemarketer Human Voices Wake Us

Here are two readings from Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs. Beverly Valentine, Funeral Home Director Jason Groth, Telemarketing Group Supervisor Depending on the response, this might become a regular format for episodes going forward, putting two different episodes into one, simply for ease of listening. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

First Person: Rome (AD 64) and America (1832) Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Seneca’s Letters to a Stoic, from c. AD 64; and from Alexis De Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, from 1832. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

First Person: London, c. 1615 Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from chapter six of Peter Ackroyd’s history of early seventeenth-century England, Civil War (or Rebellion, as the book has been retitled in its America, apparently not to upset anybody buying it by accident and hoping to read about a different Civil War). Ackroyd uses two texts to paint a brief picture of London at the time: Thomas Dekker’s The Seven Deadly Sins of London (1607), and Ben Jonson’s play Bartholomew Fair(1614). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

First Person: Pompeii (AD 79) & San Francisco (AD 1906) Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Pliny the Younger's letter, describing the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius and the destruction of Pompeii, in the year 79; and Jack London's article describing the great earthquake of San Francisco, in 1906. I end with a reading of Laurie Sheck's poem "Pompeii," from her 2003 book, Black Series. Pliny the Younger's letter can be read here; and Jack London's article can be read here; however, I only came across both of them together thanks to Lapham's Quarterly, which featured them in their Summer, 2008 issue called Book of Nature; you can buy the issue, or subscribe to the magazine, here. As I've said before, for those not independently wealthy or ensconced in academia, I know of no better resource for the discovery of voices from history. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

What Did "Collaboration" Mean in Nazi-Occupied Paris? Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of an essay of mine on cultural life and everyday life in Nazi-Occupied Paris. What did it mean to "collaborate," and what acts of collaboration were worthy of punishment or ostracism after the war? As one writer put it, “Should a woman reject a seat offered by a German in the Metro?  Should one have refused to receive civilized, non-Nazi Germans whom one had known before the war? Should one have turned one’s back on a German friend in a public place?” Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Beethoven on His Deathbed Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Jan Swafford's Beethoven: Anguish & Triumph, narrating the last months of Beethoven's life. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Poetry & Education in Eighth Century England Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of two chapters from Peter Ackroyd's book, Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination.  Chapter 5, "A Rare & Singular Bede," covers the life of the Venerable Bede, as well as education and culture in England in the eighth century. Chapter 14, "Anglo-Saxon Attitudes," is a brief look into Anglo-Saxon (aka Old English) poetry, and its continued life and reverberations in English poetry, through the present day. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

First Person: A Waitress in Chicago in the 1960s Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from one of my favorite books, Studs Terkel's Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do. Here, Terkel interviews a waitress named Dolores Dante. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Myths & Lies Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Mircea Eliade's book The Myth of the Eternal Return, where a folklorist discovers the source of a local myth and song, and tries to convince them of the "real" story. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

First Person: Vermont, 1940 Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from an interview conducted by the Federal Writer's Project during the 1930s and 1940s. The excerpt comes from the Winter 2019 issue of Lapham's Quarterly, but a larger collection of the interviews can be found in the 2004 book, Men Against Granite.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

First Person: Paris, 1785 Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Louis-Sébastien Mercier's twelve-volume Le Tableau de Paris. The translation is from Helen Simpson's 1933 selection, The Waiting City: Paris 1782-1788. The excerpt comes from the Winter 2019 issue of Lapham's Quarterly. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

George Orwell on War Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of three essays by George Orwell on the Allied bombings of German cities in World War Two, and the aftermath of the atomic bombs being dropped on Japan.  I am reading from the exhaustive (more than 1,300 pages) collection of hundreds of Orwell's essays, reviews and articles to be found in the Everyman's Library edition of George Orwell's Essays. For those who would just like to see find the text of what I've read from, their online counterparts are linked to below: As I Please #25, from May 19, 1944 As I Please #33, from July 14, 1944 You and the Atom Bomb, from October 19, 1945 An online collection of all of his As I Please articles can be found here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

First Person: Visiting a Poor Poet in Paris, 1895 Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of Harry Kessler's diary from July 10, 1895, visiting the French poet Paul Veraline. From the English translation by Laird Easton, published as Journey to the Abyss: The Diaries of Count Harry Kessler, 1880-1918. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

James Garbarino on Violent Young Men Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from James Garbarino's 1999 book on violent young men, Lost Boys: Why Our Sons Turn Violent & How We Can Save Them. Garbarino has written many other books on the topic, and this one especially can both continue to speak to us today, as well as seem like a time capsule before the internet went crazy, before smartphones, and before social media.  For these reasons & others, this episode is a good companion to only the third episode of Human Voices Wake Us, where I read from Mary Pipher's 1994 book on teenage girls, Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

George Orwell on War Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of three essays by George Orwell on the Allied bombings of German cities in World War Two, and the aftermath of the atomic bombs being dropped on Japan.  I am reading from the exhaustive (more than 1,300 pages) collection of hundreds of Orwell's essays, reviews and articles to be found in the Everyman's Library edition of George Orwell's Essays. For those who would just like to see find the text of what I've read from, their online counterparts are linked to below: As I Please #25, from May 19, 1944 As I Please #33, from July 14, 1944 You and the Atom Bomb, from October 19, 1945 An online collection of all of his As I Please articles can be found here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

George Orwell on Poverty Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from early on in George Orwell’s “Down & Out in Paris & London.” Buy the book here: https://www.amazon.com/Down-Paris-London-George-Orwell/dp/015626224X Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Andrew Solomon on Growing Up Deaf Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Andrew Solomon’s book “Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity.” This passage is taken from the chapter on the lives of deaf children, and their parents. Buy the book here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0743236726 Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

First Person: Minnesota at the Turn of the 20th Century Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Studs Terkel’s book, “American Dreams: Lost & Found.” Here, a man named Andy Johnson talks about his life. Buy the book here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1565845455 Andy Johnson’s interview is also included in Terkel’s best-of volume, “The Studs Terkel Reader”: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1595581774 Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Vermeer in Bosnia Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Lawrence Weschler’s collection of essays, “Vermeer in Bosnia,” where a war-crimes trial judge finds some solace from his daily work by visiting Vermeer’s paintings at the Mauritshuis museum. Buy the book here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0679777407 Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

George Orwell Down in the Mines Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from George Orwell’s 1937 book, “The Road to Wigan Pier.” This long passage comes from the handful of trips he took down into the coal mines of northern England, and the horrible conditions there. Buy the book here: https://www.amazon.com/Road-Wigan-Pier-George-Orwell/dp/0156767503 Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Two Bits of Kafka's "Trial" for the Election Human Voices Wake Us

Readings of two passages from Franz Kafka's "The Trial": the fable known as "Before the Law," and the concluding scene, where Josef K. is executed. The readings are taken from the recent translation of "The Trial," by Breon Mitchell: https://www.amazon.com/Trial-Translation-Restored-Schocken-Library/dp/0805209999 Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

"It is so hard to die" – A Story of Depression from 1809 Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of Stephen Ambrose's "Undaunted Courage," on the last night of Meriwether Lewis's life, in October of 1809. Unlike his more famous companion, William Clark, Lewis suffered from what we today would call depression, and this passage is one of the saddest I know. Ambrose has remarked that he wept while writing it, and it was hard to keep myself from doing the same while reading it. I should note the mistake I made when introducing the passage: this scene takes place not three days, but three years, after Lewis and Clark's return, but I haven't the heart to read this aloud again.  Buy Ambrose's book here: https://www.amazon.com/Undaunted-Courage-Meriwether-Jefferson-American/dp/0684826976 Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Jung’s Great Dream Human Voices Wake Us

Jung’s Great Dream – A reading from Jung’s memoir of his famous house dream, that gave him his first inkling of what he would later call the “collective unconscious.”  Buy the books from this episode: Memories, Dreams, Reflections,” by C. G. Jung: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0679723951/  “A Life of Jung,” by Ronald Hayman: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01FKTE24A/ Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Mary Pipher’s “Reviving Ophelia” Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Mary Pipher’s 1994 book, “Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls.”  Buy the book here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001VCHPYA/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_api_i_hQFGFb3W306ZG Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support