Autobiography

Tonight I talk about the nature of horror/true crime books and movies to ask: what makes a story truly frightening, instead of just entertaining? What kinds of movies or books, or ways of storytelling, take us beyond entertainment to true horror, to actual fear? How does the disturbing story of Ed Gein end up, filtered through convention and expectation, as “standard” (even if classic) movies like Psycho, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and The Silence of the Lambs? Discussed along the way: Marlon Brando in Apocalypse Now, the new Netflix series on Jeffrey Dahmer, the movie The Exorcist, Stephen King’s Pet Sematary, the use of crime scene photos for advertising TV shows, and the unavoidable re-traumatization of victims and their families with each new show, book, movie (or, indeed, podcast). Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Tonight I talk about a dear friend from my youth, who made a great impact on me into my early twenties. Along the way I read from Hermann Hesse’s Demian and Steppenwolf. The music that begins the episode is Simon and Garfunkel’s “Bookends Theme.” Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Stephen King's Great Novel of Parenthood & Grief Human Voices Wake Us

Tonight I spent an hour talking about Stephen King’s 1983 novel, Pet Sematary, which seems to me one of the great expressions of the anxieties of being a parent. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Give Me a Tarantula Human Voices Wake Us

Give Me a Tarantula is a scattering of thoughts on: Old Norse & Old English Edward Hopper Five Going on Six Droning Sound Driving in Ohio Vermeer & Personal Nostalgia Dead Can Dance Primo Levi Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Notes from the Grid: Simple Awareness Human Voices Wake Us

Tonight, I read the last three essays from Notes from the Grid. After a short introduction, the eighth essay begins at 6:00, the ninth at 26:30, and the tenth at 54:40. The audio from Philip Roth near the end of tonight's episode comes from Christopher Lydon's 2006 interview with him. Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here: https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Notes from the Grid: The Perpetual Adolescent Human Voices Wake Us

For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that I have been writing since 2006. Tonight, I read the sixth and seventh (which begins at 20:30). Spirit Murmur, the album of string quartet music I mention in the episode, composed by Alan Hovhaness and performed by the Shanghai Quartet, can be purchased here. Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here. https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Notes from the Grid: All Things Can Console Human Voices Wake Us

For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that it has taken me the last sixteen years to complete. Tonight, I read the fifth and the sixth. Essay number six begins at 23:27. Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here. https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Notes from the Grid: To Criticize the Critic Human Voices Wake Us

For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that it has taken me the last sixteen years to complete. Tonight, I read the third and fourth. The second essay begins at 28:28. The excerpt I play from an interview with George Steiner comes from a 1996 episode of Desert Island Discs. Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here. https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Notes from the Grid: Rediscovering the Hidden Life Human Voices Wake Us

For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that it has taken me the last sixteen years to complete. Tonight, I read the first two. Listen to the introduction, or click on the link above, to see how you can become a part of bringing the book into print.  After a short introduction, the first essay begins at 6:20, and the second begins at 30:22.  Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here: https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Loneliness, pt2 // Shakespeare, Sex & Sonnets Human Voices Wake Us

Another two part episode: The first is a brief sequel to an episode from last September, called Loneliness. (You can listen to that episode here) The second part (beginning at 19:19) is a reading from Peter Ackroyd’s biography of William Shakespeare—buy the book here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

"That Jane Goodall Tramp" // So Long, Lawrence Ferlinghetti Human Voices Wake Us

Another two-part episode: The first part is a scattershot on Jane Goodall’s appearance in Gary Larson’s The Far Side; my daughter’s reaction to hearing The Beatles’ “Revolution 9” for the first time; and thinking again about what Joan Didion taught me about jealousy, and what Leon Wieseltier’s 1996 book, Kaddish, can add to it. The second part (begins at 35:54) is a repeat from a 2/23/2021 episode, following the death of the poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

The Earliest Bookstores I Remember // Picasso's "Guernica" Human Voices Wake Us

Tonight’s episode is split into two parts: In the first, I take up a listener’s request to talk about my memories of bookstores; In the second, I read from two recent books about Pablo Picasso’s Guernica. The books I read from are Simon Schama's The Power of Art and John Richardson's Life of Picasso, Volume 4: The Minotaur Years. The second part of the episode begins at 45:08. Depending on the response, this might become a regular format for episodes going forward, putting two different episodes into one, simply for ease of listening. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Jealousy, Part 2 Human Voices Wake Us

A sequel of sorts to an episode from last year, called Jealousy. In this episode, I talk about more recent mutations of the kinds of jealousy I've felt towards other writers and creative people, and what to do about it.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Episode #200: Some Thoughts on Success & Failure Human Voices Wake Us

A reading, with comments thrown in throughout, of an essay of mine written between 2015-2016 (I get the dates wrong in the podcast). The entirety of it can be read here as There is Only the Trying: Some Thoughts on Fame & Failure. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

A small episode talking about working, and empathy and sympathy for those who live doing work they do not love, and which they derive little meaning from.   Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Shakespeare, Wordsworth & a Guy from Pittsburgh Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Shakespeare's Hamlet and book 1 of Wordsworth's The Prelude. I also share two small sections from my poem-in-progress, 1606, about the life of Shakespeare. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Poem: Unfinished Michelangelo Human Voices Wake Us

A reading my poem "Unfinished Michelangelo." You can read the poem here. It was originally published at the Basil O'Flaherty. Learn about–and see–Michelangelo's unfinished slave sculptures here. The two books I mentioned in this episode are Howard Hibbard's biography of Michelangelo, and William Wallace's wonderfully illustrated Michelangelo: The Complete Sculpture, Painting & Architecture. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

An episode from 9/27/21: In what may be my favorite episode, I talk about loneliness: is it really so bad, and is easy sociability really so much better? I also look at where my own experience of loneliness began, as a four year-old who suddenly found himself with hearing problems. For the next eight years I underwent a handful of surgeries, which were always preceded by periods of deterioration in my hearing, and where I must have lived in near-total silence. I also locate my loneliness as a creative person, and what I have always done to fill it: rather than seeking out rooms filled with friends, I've been drawn towards interviews, anecdotes on nearly any subject, autobiographies, collections of voices and snippets from history and culture and society: what was life like in ancient Rome, how do parents today deal with "gifted" or "different/difficult" children, how did a certain band make a great album? It is all a part, as is my penchant for narrative poetry: the desire not to escape from people but to reach them, to bridge the silence of loneliness, even if it is "only" through listeners and readers. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

2 Poems for the Holocaust Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of two of my poems about the Holocaust, "A Ploughed Field" and "Train." These poems were published earlier this year at Jewish Journal. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Isis in Old Age (story) Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of my story, "Isis in Old Age." It was originally published in Bold+Italic. The story can also be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Poems: A Travelogue Through Orkney from "Bone Antler Stone" Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of nine poems from the last section of my book Bone Antler Stone, on traveling through mainland Orkney. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. The poems are: Pytheas in the Shetlands The Wanderer (Flight to Orkney) Walking Birsay to Swannay The Brough of Birsay (parts 1 & 2) Grain Earth House Bone Antler Stone (Orkney Museum) The Burn of Boardhouse & the Barony Mill Skara Brae The Wanderer II (Flight from Orkney) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Poem: Chauvet, Lascaux, Altamira Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of my poem on the prehistoric painted caves of France and Spain, "Chauvet, Lascaux, Altamira," from the book Bone Antler Stone. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. My favorite books on these caves are listed below. For some reason, many of them are hard to find or by now are inordinately expensive. The best general introductions to prehistoric art that are affordable include Prehistoric Art: The Symbolic Journey of Humankind, by Randall White, and Paul Bahn's Cambridge Illustrated History of Prehistoric Art. If you can find the following at your library, they are well worth a look: Lascaux: Movement, Space and Time, by Norbert Aujoulat The Cave of Altamira, edited by Pedro A. Saura Ramos Return to Chauvet, by Jean Clottes Becoming Human: Innovation in Prehistoric Material Culture, edited by Colin Renfrew and Iain Morley.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

2 Poems: "Newgrange" and "Star Carr" Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of my poems "Star Carr" and "Newgrange" from the book Bone Antler Stone.  You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. Read about Star Carr and Newgrange on Wikipedia.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Cauldron & Drink (poem) Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of my poem "Cauldron & Drink," from the book Bone Antler Stone. This poem originally appeared in the Irish poetry journal Crannog. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. Read about the Gundestrup Cauldron from c.200 BCE-AD 300 Denmark, and the Vix Grave from c.500 BCE France.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

2 Poems: "Song to the Smith" & "A Song to Stone" Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of my poems "Song of the Smith" and "A Song to Stone," from the book Bone Antler Stone. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

"The Sun Sets Into the Sea" (poem) Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of my poem "The Sun Sets Into the Sea," from the book Bone Antler Stone. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

John Keats: "The poet has no identity" Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of part of John Keats's letter of October 27, 1818, where he talks about the poet and the poetic character. The full text of the letter is here, and the actual letter can be viewed here.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Four Columbine Poems Human Voices Wake Us

Here are four poems I wrote about Columbine. There are many others, but these are the only ones I can bear to read aloud.  The two books I mention in the introduction are Dave Cullen's Columbine, and Sue Klebold's A Mother's Reckoning. Also, any writing or interviews you can find online with Andrew Solomon are worth getting into as well, especially his book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children & the Search for Identity. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Jealousy. Along the lines of a previous long episode, "Stubbornness," I wonder aloud about the jealousy that creative people feel towards each other, especially my own, and I wonder where it comes from, and what use it can be.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Episode #100: A Belated Manifesto Human Voices Wake Us

Six months into this podcast, I come to episode #100. For those who are interested, here's a rundown of what I imagined I was doing when I got started, and how surprised I am to still be going. Thanks to all those who are listening! Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Stubbornness Human Voices Wake Us

Stubbornness. An experiment in what might become a podcast diary/autobiography, and starting off with a poem I wrote when I was 18 (sorry, I say in the episode I was 17), and wondering where my stubbornness, confidence, and early thoughts on art and creativity came from. It may not work at all. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

So Long, Lawrence Ferlinghetti Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of a few poems from Lawrence Ferlinghetti's A Coney Island of the Mind, and some reflections on Ferlinghetti himself. He died yesterday at the age of 101, and you can read his obituary here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.  I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Two Bits of Kafka's "Trial" for the Election Human Voices Wake Us

Readings of two passages from Franz Kafka's "The Trial": the fable known as "Before the Law," and the concluding scene, where Josef K. is executed. The readings are taken from the recent translation of "The Trial," by Breon Mitchell: https://www.amazon.com/Trial-Translation-Restored-Schocken-Library/dp/0805209999 Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Rereading “The English Patient” Human Voices Wake Us

A reading from Michael Ondaatje’s 1993 novel, “The English Patient,” and some thoughts on how certain books become reference points in our lives. Buy the book here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/0679745203/ Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Poems for the Lonely & Creative Night Human Voices Wake Us

A reading of five poems from my (as yet unpublished) book, "School of Night." Each circle around the strange feeling of being awake and alone at night, and the creativity and paranoia that can result. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support