Images: The Act of Writing

Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry (c. 1426-1400 BC)

Scribe Statue of Amunhotep, Son of Nebiry (c. 1426-1400 BC)

Matthew Writing His Gospel - Lindisfarne Gospel Book (c. 715-720)

Matthew Writing His Gospel – Lindisfarne Gospel Book (c. 715-720)

Hans Holbein the Younger - Portrait of Desiderius Erasmus (1523)

Hans Holbein the Younger – Portrait of Desiderius Erasmus (1523)

Caravaggio - St. Jerome (1605)

Caravaggio – St. Jerome (1605)

Johannes Vermeer - Lady Writing (1665)

Johannes Vermeer – Lady Writing (1665)

Gustave Caillebotte - Portrait of a Man Writing in His Study (1885)

Gustave Caillebotte – Portrait of a Man Writing in His Study (1885)

Vincent van Gogh - Man Writing Facing Left (1881)

Vincent van Gogh – Man Writing Facing Left (1881)

Edouard Manet - Woman Writing (1863)

Edouard Manet – Woman Writing (1863)

Pablo Picasso - Woman Writing (1934)

Pablo Picasso – Woman Writing (1934)

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5 replies »

  1. Thank you for these inspiring images! They struck a chord with me – made me realise how much I still need to keep writing – even if I have moved on from using the pen all the time to using the keyboard most of the time. Thank you again.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. St Jerome looks like a multi-tasker! Van Gogh’s model must have kept moving, there seems to be a disconnect between his legs and the rest of him, whereas Manet sketched his out so fast, she didn’t have time to move. Interesting to compare styles, thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

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